IA Law Review: Legal Legacies (Nuremberg’s Legacies: A Consideration of Perspectives on the Extent of the Trials’ Significance)

By Vynateya Purimetla (’21) The Nuremberg Trials were a series of contentious international tribunals seeking justice for Nazi war crimes and crimes against humanity during World War II. These trials undoubtedly influenced subsequent human rights law. However, there is still debate surrounding their influence on post-war global order which is why this investigation seeks to explore their specific ramifications by asking the guiding research question:  … Continue reading IA Law Review: Legal Legacies (Nuremberg’s Legacies: A Consideration of Perspectives on the Extent of the Trials’ Significance)

IA Law Review: Legal Legacies – Mandatory Minimum Sentencing’s Pervasive Effects on the Economy and Social Structure of the United States

By Vynateya Purimetla (’21) Mandatory minimum sentencing is a statute stating that offenders that commit crimes must be imprisoned for a minimum term; and not at the discretion of a judge (“Oxford”, 2017). The original intent of mandatory minimum sentencing was to increase consistency in sentences.  Currently, more than half of the inmates in federal prison have been convicted on an offense carrying a mandatory … Continue reading IA Law Review: Legal Legacies – Mandatory Minimum Sentencing’s Pervasive Effects on the Economy and Social Structure of the United States

IA Law Review: Legal Legacies – The Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918: Deregulation’s Effect on American Avifauna

  By Vynateya Purimetla(’21) Introduction and Context   The Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) was a law passed by Congress in 1918, codifying a treaty between the United States and the United Kingdom (acting on behalf of Canada), that protected billions of native birds from extinction or near-extinction from corporations and individuals. This century-old law protects birds from power lines (which kill 64 million birds … Continue reading IA Law Review: Legal Legacies – The Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918: Deregulation’s Effect on American Avifauna

IA Law Review: Acclaimed Biographies: Thurgood Marshall (1908-1993)

By Vynateya Purimetla (’21) Thurgood Marshall was the first African-American justice to sit on the United States Supreme Court, and his dedication and accomplishments in the fight for civil rights continue to make him a symbol and inspiration to all Americans. His approach to practicing law was rooted deeply in his unwavering moral compass most accurately captured by his quote: “you do what you think … Continue reading IA Law Review: Acclaimed Biographies: Thurgood Marshall (1908-1993)

IA Law Review: Legal Legacies (Brown v. Board of Education’s Trailblazing Effect on the Civil Rights Act of 1964)

By Vynateya Purimetla (’21) The 1954 landmark ruling of Brown v. Board of Education led the way for the passage of following influential civil rights legislation and allowed African-Americans to “look confidently to the future” (Klarman 8). Without the progress and groundwork laid by Brown, laws such as Brown II, the Civil Rights Act of 1957, the Civil Rights Act of 1960, and the Equal … Continue reading IA Law Review: Legal Legacies (Brown v. Board of Education’s Trailblazing Effect on the Civil Rights Act of 1964)

IA Law Review: Constitutional Interpretation (Herrera v. Wyoming 2019)

By Vynateya Purimetla (’21) Herrera et al. v. Wyoming et al., 587 U.S. 139 (2019) As of late, the Supreme Court has been increasingly embroiled in Native American disputes. In 2016, the case of Dollar General Corp v. Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians was heard. This case was equally divided (4-4), with Justice Gorsuch not participating due to his previous involvement at the circuit level. … Continue reading IA Law Review: Constitutional Interpretation (Herrera v. Wyoming 2019)

IA Law Review: Forum Analysis (The Case of Hasidic Education by Zalman Rothschild)

  By Vynateya Purimetla (’21) Zalman Rothschild’s commentary on the grey area between state education law, the Free Exercise Clause, and the hybrid-rights doctrine developed by Justice Scalia is a fascinating forum piece written for the Columbia Law Review. It masterfully circumnavigates through the complex web created by often contradicting legal precedents and explores a unique situation in which different agendas collide. Divided into three … Continue reading IA Law Review: Forum Analysis (The Case of Hasidic Education by Zalman Rothschild)

IA Law Review: Notable Cases (People v. Kevorkian 1994)

By Vynateya Purimetla (’21) The Kevorkian cases are some of the best-known of modern times for their precedent and controversial nature. Jack Kevorkian, a Michigan physician and euthanasia supporter, was tried five times between 1994 and 1999 for assisting terminally ill patients commit suicide.    A summary of the 1994 case: Sherry Miller and Marjorie Wantz were two elderly women suffering from terminal illnesses that … Continue reading IA Law Review: Notable Cases (People v. Kevorkian 1994)

IA Law Review: Acclaimed Biographies: Sandra Day O’Connor (1930-)

By Vynateya Purimetla (’21) Sandra Day O’Connor was the first woman to ever serve on the Supreme Court, and her unwillingness to be set back by her gender made her one of the most influential Justices in legal history. Her approach to practicing law was unflinchingly meticulous and rooted deeply in steadfast interpretation of the facts.   Sandra Day O’Connor, born in El Paso, Texas, … Continue reading IA Law Review: Acclaimed Biographies: Sandra Day O’Connor (1930-)

IA Law Review: Constitutional Interpretation (Hazelwood v. Kuhlmeier 1988)

By Vynateya Purimetla (’21) Hazelwood School District et al. v. Kuhlmeier et al., 484 U.S. 260 (1988) For IA Law Review’s first article, I deemed it fitting that we discuss the landmark Supreme Court case concerning freedom of expression in school newspapers. This case concerns the censorship of a school newspaper, The Spectrum, by Hazelwood East High School. Student journalists were furious when the school … Continue reading IA Law Review: Constitutional Interpretation (Hazelwood v. Kuhlmeier 1988)