IA Law Review: Legal Legacies (Law in Conjunction with the Civil Rights Movement)

By Vynateya Purimetla (’21) Image courtesy of the Chicago Sun-Times The civil rights movement of 1954 to 1968 was an African-American struggle to enforce desegregation rulings and achieve equal civil rights free of racial discrimination. This movement relied on three separate facets; mass mobilization, legal verdicts, and media publicity. Although mass mobilization, including grassroots activism, protests, and marches, was an integral component of achieving civil … Continue reading IA Law Review: Legal Legacies (Law in Conjunction with the Civil Rights Movement)

IA Law Review: Constitutional Interpretation (Tandon v. Newsom)

By Vynateya Purimetla (’21) Tandon v. Newsom et al., 593 U.S. (2021) Throughout the ongoing pandemic, there has been a fervent debate between individual liberty and collective security. This universal debate takes a religious face in Tandon v. Newsom. Currently, California Governor Gavin Newsom upholds restrictions against gatherings of four or more in accordance with CDC guidelines. Ritesh Tandon, however, brought this issue to the … Continue reading IA Law Review: Constitutional Interpretation (Tandon v. Newsom)

IA Law Review: Constitutional Interpretation (19th Amendment)

By Vynateya Purimetla (’21) As the anniversary of the 19th amendment approaches, the right to vote remains as pertinent in our civic landscape as ever. Throughout United States history, voting rights have expanded from simply land-owning white men in 1776 to all law-abiding citizens over 18. Although the law has expanded to remove explicit discrimination, through measures like voter suppression and gerrymandering, systematic obstacles still … Continue reading IA Law Review: Constitutional Interpretation (19th Amendment)

2020 Election Op-Ed: Biden Trumps Trump

By Vynateya Purimetla (’21) On November 7th, 2020, the Associated Press, CNN, MSNBC, and other news networks called the 2020 election for Joe Biden of the Democratic Party. Although his win was not the landslide projected by numerous pollsters, it was still a decisive mandate and a historic win. He became the first challenger to defeat an incumbent in 28 years, he gained more votes … Continue reading 2020 Election Op-Ed: Biden Trumps Trump

2020 Election Op-Ed: Biden-Harris’ Uphill Climb

By Vynateya Purimetla (’21) Although Biden has won by a decisive mandate, the new administration will face momentous challenges. Fortunately for America, Biden, the leader of the 2008 Recovery Act, and spearheaded as the “Comeback Kid” can do it. The most pressing issue, that 94% of Biden voters ranked as their most important motivator, is the coronavirus pandemic. As of November 13, coronavirus cases are … Continue reading 2020 Election Op-Ed: Biden-Harris’ Uphill Climb

2020 Election Op-Ed: Georgia–The Battle for the Senate

By Vynateya Purimetla (’21) As the 2020 election cycle draws to a close, the House has been retained by the Democrats, though 5 net seats were lost and Joe Biden has won the Presidency by 306 electoral votes. However, one branch of the government hasn’t reached a conclusion: the Senate. Although the Democrats have picked up a seat in Arizona, they have not reached 50 … Continue reading 2020 Election Op-Ed: Georgia–The Battle for the Senate

2020 Election Op-Ed: Polling’s Plunders

By Vynateya Purimetla (’21) In the 2016 election, Secretary of State Hillary R. Clinton was favored with a 3% national lead over challenger Donald J. Trump, and was predicted to win with 300 electoral votes. In a shocking upset, razor-thin margins in swing states like Florida, Ohio, Iowa, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, and Michigan all flipped to Trump. In margins of 0.3% in Michigan and 0.7% in … Continue reading 2020 Election Op-Ed: Polling’s Plunders

2020 Election Op-Ed: Trump’s Leviathan Legacy

By Vynateya Purimetla (’21) Although Trump has lost the 2020 election in a historic defeat, the damage he has wrought on this country will not be as easily dispensable. Through his term, his inaction on coronavirus and climate change, incompetence on the international stage, polarizing personality, and fractures to the political discourse can not be understated. Like his entire presidency, his exit and lame-duck period … Continue reading 2020 Election Op-Ed: Trump’s Leviathan Legacy

IA Law Review: Acclaimed Biographies: Ruth Bader Ginsburg (1933-2020)

Remembering Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s Remarkable Legacy By Vynateya Purimetla (’21) “People ask me sometimes… ‘when will there be enough women on the Supreme Court?’ And my answer is: when there are nine.” Ruth Bader Ginsburg was born in Brooklyn, New York to Jewish immigrant parents. Her mother Celia was a bright student, but was forced to discontinue schooling at 15 because her family chose to … Continue reading IA Law Review: Acclaimed Biographies: Ruth Bader Ginsburg (1933-2020)

IA Law Review – Justin Amash: Courageous Independence from Overt Partisanship

By Vynateya Purimetla (’21) On July 4, 2019, Congressman Justin Amash announced his parting from the Republican Party, citing George Washington’s emotive warning against blinding partisanship amongst other reasons in his Independence Day editorial for The Washington Post (Amash). Just five months later, he was faced with a historic decision done only twice before: impeaching a sitting President of the United States. On that landmark … Continue reading IA Law Review – Justin Amash: Courageous Independence from Overt Partisanship