Is it Time to Lower the Voting Age?

By Amr Ansari (‘22) and Tasawwar Rahman (‘22) Image Courtesy of Paul Hennessy/NurPhoto via Zuma Press For: Lower the Voting Age– Just a Little By Amr Ansari (‘22) Seventeen years after president Eisenhower called for the minimum voting age to be 18 in his 1954 state of the union address, the United States added the 26th amendment to the constitution, guaranteeing those 18 and older … Continue reading Is it Time to Lower the Voting Age?

Law and Disorder: Nero Fiddled While Rome Burned, Trump Tweeted

By Tasawwar Rahman (‘22) January 6, 2021– a date which will live in infamy– the United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by the President of the United States, aided and abetted by his most violent factions. But let there be no doubt that this attack, against a coequal branch of government, lies squarely at the feet of the President. A President whom … Continue reading Law and Disorder: Nero Fiddled While Rome Burned, Trump Tweeted

2020 Election Op-Ed: Biden Trumps Trump

By Vynateya Purimetla (’21) On November 7th, 2020, the Associated Press, CNN, MSNBC, and other news networks called the 2020 election for Joe Biden of the Democratic Party. Although his win was not the landslide projected by numerous pollsters, it was still a decisive mandate and a historic win. He became the first challenger to defeat an incumbent in 28 years, he gained more votes … Continue reading 2020 Election Op-Ed: Biden Trumps Trump

2020 Election Op-Ed: Biden-Harris’ Uphill Climb

By Vynateya Purimetla (’21) Although Biden has won by a decisive mandate, the new administration will face momentous challenges. Fortunately for America, Biden, the leader of the 2008 Recovery Act, and spearheaded as the “Comeback Kid” can do it. The most pressing issue, that 94% of Biden voters ranked as their most important motivator, is the coronavirus pandemic. As of November 13, coronavirus cases are … Continue reading 2020 Election Op-Ed: Biden-Harris’ Uphill Climb

2020 Election Op-Ed: Georgia–The Battle for the Senate

By Vynateya Purimetla (’21) As the 2020 election cycle draws to a close, the House has been retained by the Democrats, though 5 net seats were lost and Joe Biden has won the Presidency by 306 electoral votes. However, one branch of the government hasn’t reached a conclusion: the Senate. Although the Democrats have picked up a seat in Arizona, they have not reached 50 … Continue reading 2020 Election Op-Ed: Georgia–The Battle for the Senate

2020 Election Op-Ed: Polling’s Plunders

By Vynateya Purimetla (’21) In the 2016 election, Secretary of State Hillary R. Clinton was favored with a 3% national lead over challenger Donald J. Trump, and was predicted to win with 300 electoral votes. In a shocking upset, razor-thin margins in swing states like Florida, Ohio, Iowa, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, and Michigan all flipped to Trump. In margins of 0.3% in Michigan and 0.7% in … Continue reading 2020 Election Op-Ed: Polling’s Plunders

2020 Election Op-Ed: Trump’s Leviathan Legacy

By Vynateya Purimetla (’21) Although Trump has lost the 2020 election in a historic defeat, the damage he has wrought on this country will not be as easily dispensable. Through his term, his inaction on coronavirus and climate change, incompetence on the international stage, polarizing personality, and fractures to the political discourse can not be understated. Like his entire presidency, his exit and lame-duck period … Continue reading 2020 Election Op-Ed: Trump’s Leviathan Legacy

Supreme Question

By Tasawwar Rahman (’22) and Leah Raymond (’22) On September 18th, 2020, the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg sadly passed away.  Without batting an eye and mere hours after it was announced, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell immediately announced that if President Trump were to nominate the 115th Justice, the nomination would receive a vote on the Senate floor.  Just eight days after Justice Ginsburg’s … Continue reading Supreme Question

Why this Election is no 2016

By Amr Ansari (‘22) As a twelve-year-old somewhat naive seventh grader, when I awoke on November 8th, 2016, the victory of Donald Trump as the President elect was, well, inconsequential. Yet I was not completely oblivious. I knew, like most, that Secretary Hillary Clinton was expected to win the presidency, and perhaps even by a landslide. But how did I “know” so definitively that this … Continue reading Why this Election is no 2016

The Brain and the Ballot Box

By Abigail Kendal (’22) As the most important election of our lives approaches quickly, many emotions are slowly starting to bubble to the surface. Our parents are worried about their crippling debt, our neighbors are pleading for racial justice, our grandparents are anxious about the future of our healthcare system, and our friends are fighting ceaselessly to restore our planet. We are all aware of … Continue reading The Brain and the Ballot Box