Strained Relations- U.S. and Russia Part II

By Rachel Rochford (’23) With a new administration, policies, reactions, and events, it would be fair to say that relations between these two nations are shakier now than they were last time this column covered them. We last discussed the U.S.-Russia relationship whilst Trump was still in office. At the time, there was tension over the Solar Winds hack which probed into U.S. government systems … Continue reading Strained Relations- U.S. and Russia Part II

Mars Standard Time Zone

By Siya Chhabra (’24) A historical, Wright-Brothers-like event took place on Mars on April 16th, 2021. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration, commonly known as NASA, successfully completed a momentous flight to the Red Planet. The Ingenuity helicopter independently flew through the atmosphere, without the superintendence and control of the phalanxes of individuals it generally takes to undergo a similar expedition into the unknown environment … Continue reading Mars Standard Time Zone

A Moment of Inspiration: Taking Flight

By Morgan Cook (’22) When a tragedy occurs or an unfortunate situation leads to wrong decision making, it is often difficult for many to break out of a certain lifestyle or find motivation to change their ways. However, for Rodney Stotts, solace came from an unlikely source.                                       For years, Stotts was involved in the crack cocaine epidemic plaguing America during his youth in Washington D.C. … Continue reading A Moment of Inspiration: Taking Flight

IA Law Review: Legal Legacies (Law in Conjunction with the Civil Rights Movement)

By Vynateya Purimetla (’21) Image courtesy of the Chicago Sun-Times The civil rights movement of 1954 to 1968 was an African-American struggle to enforce desegregation rulings and achieve equal civil rights free of racial discrimination. This movement relied on three separate facets; mass mobilization, legal verdicts, and media publicity. Although mass mobilization, including grassroots activism, protests, and marches, was an integral component of achieving civil … Continue reading IA Law Review: Legal Legacies (Law in Conjunction with the Civil Rights Movement)

IA Law Review: Constitutional Interpretation (Tandon v. Newsom)

By Vynateya Purimetla (’21) Tandon v. Newsom et al., 593 U.S. (2021) Throughout the ongoing pandemic, there has been a fervent debate between individual liberty and collective security. This universal debate takes a religious face in Tandon v. Newsom. Currently, California Governor Gavin Newsom upholds restrictions against gatherings of four or more in accordance with CDC guidelines. Ritesh Tandon, however, brought this issue to the … Continue reading IA Law Review: Constitutional Interpretation (Tandon v. Newsom)

IA Law Review: Constitutional Interpretation (19th Amendment)

By Vynateya Purimetla (’21) As the anniversary of the 19th amendment approaches, the right to vote remains as pertinent in our civic landscape as ever. Throughout United States history, voting rights have expanded from simply land-owning white men in 1776 to all law-abiding citizens over 18. Although the law has expanded to remove explicit discrimination, through measures like voter suppression and gerrymandering, systematic obstacles still … Continue reading IA Law Review: Constitutional Interpretation (19th Amendment)

Japan and South Korea

By Rachel Rochford (’23) Recently, Kim Yo Jong, sister of the North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, stated “If [the U.S.] wants to sleep in peace for the coming four years, it had better refrain from causing a stink at its first step” regarding joint military exercises between the U.S. and South Korea (Foreign Policy). The U.S. response to this has not been with particular … Continue reading Japan and South Korea

The Grammys or The Scammys?

By Akshara Karthik (‘22) The beautiful 24-karat gold gramophone Grammy Award was once the most sought-after award amongst the music industry.  Today, it still stands as a major music honor, though many artists have begun severing ties with the Grammys amid scrutiny and criticism over the Recording Academy’s lack of transparency and failure to foster diversity in their nominations. Over the past decade, many artists … Continue reading The Grammys or The Scammys?

The Precision Medicine Show: Episode 1 – TV’s Next Big Hit

By Diya Ramesh (‘23) If you love WandaVision, enjoy the references made to it throughout this series. If not, pretend they’re not there! BEEP, BEEP, BEEP! As usual, you wonder why alarm clocks haven’t yet been declared a form of cruel and unusual punishment. All the same, you slide out of bed, albeit very reluctantly. Bleary-eyed and half-asleep, you stumble into the bathroom to brush … Continue reading The Precision Medicine Show: Episode 1 – TV’s Next Big Hit

“Mr. Vice President, I’m speaking!”

By Siya Chhabra (’24) For the first time in all of American history, a female Vice President was elected. Vice President Kamala Harris not only changed the face of history, but became a condition precedent to what is hopefully a rise in women in leadership in the near future. However, in order to understand the ideology of female leaders, we must revisit the past to … Continue reading “Mr. Vice President, I’m speaking!”